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A reference for Used and Rare Books, Periodicals, and Paper Ephemera courtesy of an International Co-Op of Independent Dealers.
 
 
 
Stanley Knowles
 
 
Sample Autograph Signature:
 
Stanley  Knowles signature
 
Stanley Knowles
 
'Canadian Member of Parliament, minister and author. Stanley Howard Knowles ( - ) was born in Los Angeles, CA to Canadian parents. He graduated from Los Angeles' Manual Arts High School at the age of with training as a printer, but had also been the yearbook editor and a member of the debating team. Shortly after graduating, he visited relatives in Manitoba, Canada and Massachusetts, and then went to New York City where he planned to attend the Columbia University. He withdrew after a month, announcing a little later that he felt the call to be a missionary. He went back to Manitoba where he spent a year with the family of an aunt before returning to Los Angeles in the fall of where he worked part-time as a printer and enrolled in the non-denominational (but theologically conservative and evangelical) California Christian College. While he did well academically, but his strained relationship with his new stepmother and decided to move back with his more warmly welcoming relatives in Manitoba, find a job, and save enough to resume his education toward a missionary career. During the next year he did just that and in September entered Brandon College, a Baptist college not far from his aunt's home. When he graduated in , Brandon's President publicly praised him: �I greatly doubt if the scholastic record made by Mr. Stanley Knowles this year has ever been equaled in the history of the institution.� For the next 3 years, he studied at United Colleges in Winnipeg and received his theological diploma in and was ordained in the United Church of Canada. Beginning in his later years at Brandon, Knowles evolved toward religious liberalism. His decision to attend United reflected his misgivings about becoming a Baptist, and by the time he left Union he had been strongly influenced by the 'Social Gospel' movement and shifted from a faith based solely on individual salvation to one that emphasized the equal importance of the Gospel's social mission. Although he worked as a minister until when he was elected to the Canadian House of Commons, he had joined the Cooperative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) party in and ran unsuccessfully twice for election to the House of Commons and once for the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba in . Knowles remained in his seat until when he failed to be reelected and went to work for the Canadian Labor Congress where he help found the New Democratic Party (NDP), which combined the old CCF with the labor movement. In , Knowles was elected a Member of Parliament for the NDP and served until . Through the s and s Knowles used his legendary knowledge of parliamentary procedure to leverage his minority party's power to promote social justice such as increases to Old Age Security benefits, introduction of the Canada Pension Plan, as well as other progressive measures. He served as the CCF and NDP House Leader for decades, and was even asked by Progressive Conservative Party leader John George Diefenbaker Knowles to become Speaker of the Canadian House of Commons when he became Prime Minister. Knowles declined. Diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in , he still worked long hours until a massive stroke in lead to his retirement in when Parliament named him an honorary officer of the House with a place, for life, at the Clerk's Table. He was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada in . From to he was the Chancellor of Brandon University. He was the author of The New Party / Le Nouveau Parti published in .'
 
Please note that while we have reason to be confident that the signature is genuine by virtue of its source, it has not undergone any expert examination or verification. Accordingly, TomFolio does not guarantee the authenticity, nor can a comparison of a signature with this example exclude the possibility of an autopen, a printed facsimile, or a reasonably capable forgery.
 
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